In detail

Coughing and colds of children

Coughing and colds of children


Children breed often. Colds and coughs are usually caused by viruses (not bacteria), so antibiotics are not recommended.

Chest infection

If the cough is severe and persistent, the child may suffer from a chest infection caused by a bacterium - and in this case medical advice is recommended.

Symptoms

The child has a runny nose or a rhinoree (runny nose).

Sneeze.

She has a fever.

Headaches.

He has a noisy cough.

Children cough to remove the mucus accumulated in the horses. For this reason, the productive cough should not be completely prevented.

Bronchiolitis

Bronsiolitis is an infection of the small bronchi, airways in the lungs. This usually occurs in babies because their airways are smaller. It starts similar to a cold, then the cough worsens and a hissing sounds when the baby expires. There may be breathing difficulties when swallowing food. This can be improved within 2-3 days, although coughing may persist for several weeks.

You should talk to your doctor right from the first symptoms:

  • If the child has difficulty breathing.
  • The child consumes only half of the normal meals.
  • If the neck pain does not improve or worsen after two days.
  • If the child does not consume enough liquid for 24 hours.
  • In case the child has difficulty swallowing.

Home care

The child must rest and consume plenty of fluids.

You can take paracetamol to reduce the feeling of discomfort caused by fever.

During sleep, the baby's head should be in a higher position than the rest of the body.

Ask the doctor or pharmacist for advice on choosing nasal drops to undo the baby's nose and facilitate breathing so he can sleep and eat more easily.

Croup

It is a respiratory condition caused by a viral infection of the upper respiratory tract. It occurs when the back of the neck becomes inflamed, making breathing difficult. It can manifest itself in a cold.

Symptoms

Dry cough and noisy breathing.

Observation: Consult your doctor about these symptoms or go to the hospital if the disease worsens.

Read more here!

For more recommendations consult your doctor or pharmacist!

The material is based on the "Children's Panadol: Zero to five-Australia" booklet, written by Nursing Assistants Lindy Danvers RN, RM, M'craft, and Susan Prescott RN, RM, M'craft, Grad. Dip Child Health, in collaboration with journalist Kay Stammers BA Hons., TPTC.