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My little girl doesn't want to sleep alone anymore

My little girl doesn't want to sleep alone anymore


Question:

- My little girl, Alice, no longer wants to sleep alone in her crib (which is in our bedroom). The day, after eating at the prince, makes dwarfs. I fall asleep in our bed and then put her in her crib, where she sleeps for an hour, after which she wakes up and cries. I take her to our bed, I fall asleep and then try to put her back in her crib, but as she touches the crib she makes her eyes big and weeps. We put her back in bed and Alice (aged by an anisle and a month) sleeps on the log. The story repeats itself at night, of course. Believe me, I don't know how to fix the problem and convince my little girl to sleep in her crib again as she did until the 10th month. (IM.)

Answer:

In your attempt to disobey the girl by this problematic behavior, a certain "power" of the parents is needed, a "power" of not being impressed and thus conditioned by the little crying. If up to 10 months the girl slept alone in her crib and everything was fine, I see now no reason why she could not sleep alone.

In your attempt to disobey the girl by this problematic behavior, a certain "power" of the parents is needed, a "power" of not being impressed and thus conditioned by the little crying. If up to 10 months the girl slept alone in her crib and everything was fine, I see now no reason why she could not sleep alone.
The crying is his unconscious way of attracting your attention and making sure you take it with you to bed. Just as she has become accustomed to coming to your bed, so, with much patience and constant reaction, will become disobedient. So desirable would be for her to lie down and stay in her crib later and any intervention from her parents would be confined to her quietness, her sleep again and in any case not to moving her to bed with you.


Repeating this move many times, the little girl has definitely learned that her crying has the consequence of moving and so she will expect you to react. you want it. Do not give in to her insistence, quiet her but do not bring her to bed.
It will gradually accommodate this separation from the parents' bed both during the day and at night. Sleep problems in young children are a way of expressing their unfulfilled desires, such as the presence of the mother or father nearby, the need for protection, security and being loved; and that's why talking to the girl because you say you are in the same room, but without bringing her to bed, you can keep in touch with her, as she can be aware of the physical closeness of the parents.
Good luck!
Clara Monica Christmas,
psychologist
- Psychosolutions Clinic.
www.psihosolutions.ro