In detail

Mp3 players, a real danger

Mp3 players, a real danger



Ipods and other portable players have changed the way people listen to music. As the popularity of these devices increased, so did the concerns of experts in the field. They believe that hearing impairment will become as common as these devices.
Researchers fear that there will be more and more people losing their hearing due to prolonged exposure to music heard to the fullest. With the advent of new mp3 players, such as the Ipod, considerable improvements have been made regarding the sound quality. The sound quality, the portable character, but also the opportunity to have an mp3 player, makes it even more dangerous.
How can mp3 players affect our hearing?
Music and loud sounds can affect the ciliary cells of the cochlea, one of the compartments of the inner ear. Cohleea functions as a mechanical-electric transducer, transforming the mechanical vibrations of the middle ear into electrical signals, which are sent to the auditory nerve.
These cells may regenerate after loss of function, but in the case of extremely high and prolonged sounds, they may be permanently affected. Once destroyed, they can no longer regenerate and partial hearing loss is present.
To prevent hearing problems of any kind, the researchers conducted various studies and came to the question: what kind of headphones are least harmful to us?
One of the hypotheses supports the headphones you enter in the ear canal because it is assumed that if you do not hear the outside sounds, you do not feel the need to give the volume louder. Research in this regard is still ongoing, but in the meantime doctors advise us to make music slower.
How do we realize that music is too loud?
There are a few simple ways to find out if you're listening to too much music. The music you listen to is too loud if:

  • your player volume is set to more than 60%
  • do not hear the conversations around you
  • the people next to you hear the music you listen to
  • you realize that you speak too loudly, even though the person you are talking to is close to you
    Laura Moise
    Editor
    August 14, 2007